The Latest News From...

The Latest News From...

Thursday, June 23, 2016

FTC Charges Mobile Ad Network InMobi with Tracking Child Consumers without Parental Consent


The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) settled charges with InMobi, a mobile advertising company, for deceptively tracking the locations of hundreds of millions of consumers (including children) around the world (which the FTC charged is a violation of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). InMobi will pay a fine of $950,000.

The FTC alleged that InMobi gathered geolocation information on mobile device users without knowledge or permission and then utilized that information to serve geo-targeted advertising. InMobi misrepresented that it would only track consumers' locations if they opted in. However, according to the FTC complaint, InMobi was tracking consumers' locations even when consumers expressly denied permission to do so. The company did so by collecting information about the WiFi networks that the consumer’s device connected to or that were in-range of the consumer’s device.

In addition to ceasing its deceptive practices like geolocating devices without user's permission, the settlement deal also requires InMobi to delete any information it collected on children. According to Jessica Rich, Director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, “This settlement ensures that InMobi will honor consumers’ privacy choices in the future, and will be held accountable for keeping their privacy promises.”

For further details on the settlement, visit the FTC's Press Release online.

Monday, June 13, 2016

June is Internet Safety Month-- And a Good Reminder to Check Your Children's Online Activities


School is almost out and that means your children will have more free time to browse the Internet (and hopefully play outside). June is Internet Safety Awareness Month--and a great time to remind ourselves to monitor what our children are doing online. 

In today's digital age it's critically important that young internet users understand how to browse the internet safely. While some children may not have the necessary judgment to understand the consequences of sharing personal information or photos, other children may choose to break the rules. That's why it's important to have a discussion about this important topic with your children.

Remember the risk that being online involves and talk to your children about how to be a safe internet user. Here are some tips to get the ball rolling:

Open Communication - Inform your child that you will be monitoring his or her behavior and explain why. Set rules and discuss them with your child in advance. 

Set Boundaries - Explain to your child what is and is not appropriate to share. Determine who they can and cannot communicate with. Set a policy about sharing photos, your location, your phone number, address, etc. Help them understand the reality involved with sharing such information as well as the potential consequences.

Monitor Online Presence - Make sure to collect your child's passwords and usernames for sites he or she wishes to use. Check regularly to ensure you approve of what information they are sharing.

Review Apps - Ensure that apps have a privacy policy and check to see what information is being collected. Verify whether the apps your child is using are free and if they are not discuss what you are comfortable with your child downloading and why. 

For more Internet safety tips, check out CARU's tips for Safety on Screen.

And now is also a great time to check your own online practices and make sure you are browsing safely and securely as well!

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

A Recap of CARU's 2016 West Coast Conference

The preliminary feedback is in and CARU’s 2016 Annual Conference was a resounding success. Indeed, one comment was that the conference was taken to an entirely different level this year. It was held at the beautiful Ritz-Carlton in Marina Del Ray. It was very well attended with both CARU Supporters and others in the children’s advertising industry including: Cartoon Network, Disney, Dreamworks, General Mills, Google, MPAA, Nickelodeon and many more. The conference was officially titled, Reimagining Children’s Advertising: Getting it Right in an Evolving Landscape. All of the panels featured expert speakers and in-depth substantive content.

The conference got a rousing start from a fireside chat between Paul Berberian, CEO of Sphero (maker of BB-8 toy from Star Wars) and ASRC’s CEO, Lee Peeler. Paul described the process by which Sphero obtained the contract from Disney to create and market BB-8 and the various pitfalls they worked hard to avoid along the way. If you haven't read it already, be sure to check out the recent article published in the New Yorker about Sphero and featuring Paul Berberian.



The lineup also included an inside look at COPPA and the aftermath of the amendments to the Rule. The panel featured Lindsey Tonsager of Covington & Burling and Matthew Vidal from Nickelodeon.


Of course, the explosion of mobile marketing to children merited a panel with Amy Mudge of Venable LLP, Don McGowan of The Pokemon Company and Michelle Lee of IDEO.


The audience was able to participate in groups and submitting feedback the next panel on Data Security hosted by Liisa Thomas of Winston & Strawn, LLP and Molly Morse of Kekst.

After a sumptuous networking lunch held alfresco right next to the marina, CARU’s second keynote speaker, Madeline Di Nonno, CEO of the Geena Davis Gender in the Media Institute engaged the audience with a fascinating discussion about gender bias in the media.

The afternoon continued with interesting panels. Alan Friel of Baker Hostetler, Linda Goldstein of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP and Sara Perry from Dreamworks discussed native advertising and endorsements, two extremely current topics facing the industry. 

The CARU & CFBAI year in review was given by CARU’s own Angela Tiffin and CFBAI’s Maureen Enright.



The final panel, a humorous and insightful presentation on marketing toys featured  Sheila Millar of Keller and Heckman, Mick Monahan of Mattel and Amanda O’Keefe of Activision Blizzard, Inc.
Overall, it was a great day for all and CARU looks forward to its next conference.

Friday, April 29, 2016

Don't forget to register for the CARU and IBA Accountability Conferences!

Two Terrific Conferences! One Beautiful Venue!Multiple Networking Opportunities!







CARU Supporter and CBBB National Partner rate for CARU conference



CBBB National Partner and Members of Participating DAA Trades for IBA conference
  

$649

$195

​ Standard rates

​ Standard rates

Contact us if you have questions about group rates at (212) 705-0113


We appreciate the support of our sponsors!

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Amazon Found Liable for In-App Purchases Made by Kids


A Federal Court finds Amazon liable for billing parents for children’s unauthorized in-app charges. This morning, a federal judge granted the Federal Trade Commission’s request for summary judgment in the agency’s lawsuit against Amazon, Inc., for billing consumers for unauthorized in-app charges incurred by children. The FTC issued a press release detailing the case.

Click here for more information.

CARU's PSA Campaign Gets Some Press


CARU's Public Service Announcement was recently featured on Reed Smith's blog, AdLaw by Request in an article by John Feldman. The article announced to its many industry followers about the campaign, which will premiere at the CARU West Coast conference on May 11th.

Seats are still available for CARU's conference. For more information about registering for this not-to-be-missed event, click here.

And don't forget, for a sneak preview of the CARU PSA, visit the links below.



Monday, April 18, 2016

CARU Releases its Second Public Service Campaign!

Get a sneak peek at the Children's Advertising Review Unit's (CARU) second public service campaign. CARU's last PSA Campaign was nominated for an Emmy Award, aired on prime time shows including Good Morning America, Rachel Ray, Live with Kelly, and received thousands of hits on YouTube.



Click here to view CARU's YouTube Channel.